Building tension: can this golden age of horror remakes sustain itself?

Resident Evil timeline - Resident Evil 4

A Resident Evil 4 remake. Just the thought of it alone sends a shiver down my spine quicker than a mindless Ganado shambling up a rickety old ladder. And now it’s officially happening. Soon, too – March 24, 2023, as revealed during Sony’s most recent State of Play showcase. As a dyed-in-the-wool fan of Resident Evil 2, I was blown away by the standard of Capcom’s brilliant 2019 reimagining, and while failing to hit the same heights the following year, I loved the Resident Evil 3 remake despite its rough edges. 

With RE4 now on its way, as well as a new slant on the original Dead Space, a Silent Hill 2 remake seemingly in the works, and the fact that the long-awaited System Shock now appears to finally be on the cusp of release, it really feels like we’re in the midst of a golden age of horror remakes. With E3 2022 now upon us (be sure to keep your eyes on our E3 2022 schedule), who knows, we might have even more to look forward to in due course. My only concern at this stage is: does all of this come at a cost?

Long shadows

Dead Space remake

(Image credit: Motive)

READ MORESilent Hill 2

Silent Hill 2

(Image credit: Konami)

“The thought of a Silent Hill 2 remake falling short makes me wince harder than Mr Kennedy upon first confronting El Gigante”.

With all of this, I’m quietly confident the Resident Evil 4 remake will deliver on its promise, and, if it does, it will set the bar even higher so far as horror game remakes are concerned. My only worry, then, is how this impacts the broader landscape of horror game remakes. Don’t get me wrong: I’m not complaining. This is a great position to be in, but I love Silent Hill 2 more than anything the Resident Evil series has ever served up, and the thought of it falling short makes me wince harder than Mr Kennedy upon first confronting El Gigante. System Shock’s Kickstarter, on the other hand, was funded in 2016 and, as if being held to the Resi 2 remake’s gold standard of horror remakes wasn’t enough, it now bears the weight of six years’ worth of anticipation. The original Dead Space was unashamedly inspired by OG Resident Evil 4, therefore the Dead Space remake’s arrival mere months before the latter’s reimagining needs to be on the money. And then consider that The Callisto Protocol looks like Dead Space 4 under another name; while Slitterhead, led by Silent Hill creator Keiichiro Toyama, looks like a modern take on old school Silent Hill, all in the wake of Hideo Kojima’s much-hyped but ultimately ill-fated Silent Hills project, and it’s safe to say there is some fierce competition, and some remarkably high expectations, encompassing the modern horror genre. 

Is it sustainable? I don’t know. It’s an odd position to be in – praising video games for being brilliant, taking risks and steadily setting new, higher standards; all the while being simultaneously terrified that one big high-profile failure could bring the whole thing down. Hypothetically, should one hyped-up horror remake fall flat, would that make another developer think twice about investing in the next one? I guess time will tell. I often praise horror games for their scope to scare with what we cannot see, and here am I figuratively crapping my pants about something that hasn’t yet happened, despite what I think is probably inevitable at some stage. In any event, I’m more than happy to see horror remakes go from strength to strength, as I edge myself further and further behind the back of the couch. And with so much to look forward to in the next year or so on the horror remakes front, I could be behind there for some time. 


Scare yourself silly with the best horror games out now. 


More information about Building tension: can this golden age of horror remakes sustain itself?

A Resident Evil 4 remake. Just the thought of it alone sends a shiver down my spine quicker than a mindless Ganado shambling up a rickety old ladder. And now it’s officially happening. Soon, too – March 24, 2023, as revealed during Sony’s most recent State of Play showcase. As a dyed-in-the-wool fan of Resident Evil 2, I was blown away by the standard of Capcom’s brilliant 2019 reimagining, and while failing to hit the same heights the following year, I loved the Resident Evil 3 remake despite its rough edges. 
With RE4 now on its way, as well as a new slant on the original Dead Space, a Silent Hill 2 remake seemingly in the works, and the fact that the long-awaited System Shock now appears to finally be on the cusp of release, it really feels like we’re in the midst of a golden age of horror remakes. With E3 2022 now upon us (be sure to keep your eyes on our E3 2022 schedule), who knows, we might have even more to look forward to in due course. My only concern at this stage is: does all of this come at a cost?
Long shadows

(Image credit: Motive)
READ MORE

(Image credit: Konami)

“The thought of a Silent Hill 2 remake falling short makes me wince harder than Mr Kennedy upon first confronting El Gigante”.

With all of this, I’m quietly confident the Resident Evil 4 remake will deliver on its promise, and, if it does, it will set the bar even higher so far as horror game remakes are concerned. My only worry, then, is how this impacts the broader landscape of horror game remakes. Don’t get me wrong: I’m not complaining. This is a great position to be in, but I love Silent Hill 2 more than anything the Resident Evil series has ever served up, and the thought of it falling short makes me wince harder than Mr Kennedy upon first confronting El Gigante. System Shock’s Kickstarter, on the other hand, was funded in 2016 and, as if being held to the Resi 2 remake’s gold standard of horror remakes wasn’t enough, it now bears the weight of six years’ worth of anticipation. The original Dead Space was unashamedly inspired by OG Resident Evil 4, therefore the Dead Space remake’s arrival mere months before the latter’s reimagining needs to be on the money. And then consider that The Callisto Protocol looks like Dead Space 4 under another name; while Slitterhead, led by Silent Hill creator Keiichiro Toyama, looks like a modern take on old school Silent Hill, all in the wake of Hideo Kojima’s much-hyped but ultimately ill-fated Silent Hills project, and it’s safe to say there is some fierce competition, and some remarkably high expectations, encompassing the modern horror genre. 
Is it sustainable? I don’t know. It’s an odd position to be in – praising video games for being brilliant, taking risks and steadily setting new, higher standards; all the while being simultaneously terrified that one big high-profile failure could bring the whole thing down. Hypothetically, should one hyped-up horror remake fall flat, would that make another developer think twice about investing in the next one? I guess time will tell. I often praise horror games for their scope to scare with what we cannot see, and here am I figuratively crapping my pants about something that hasn’t yet happened, despite what I think is probably inevitable at some stage. In any event, I’m more than happy to see horror remakes go from strength to strength, as I edge myself further and further behind the back of the couch. And with so much to look forward to in the next year or so on the horror remakes front, I could be behind there for some time. 
Scare yourself silly with the best horror games out now. 

#Building #tension #golden #age #horror #remakes #sustain


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