Have You Tried… making friends with pigs in a post-apocalyptic wasteland in No Place Like Home?

My god, there is so much trash. Towering monoliths of earth, plastic bottles, rubber duckies, carrier bags and other disposable objects are almost the only visual language of the Earth you land on in No Place Like Home. You play as Ellen, a young woman who has returned to Earth from her spaceship to try to find her grandfather. But, what she returns to is a dilapidated farmhouse that has been basically flattened by a trash storm that has left nothing but trash in its wake.

While it may sound like a nightmare – and a less than subtle commentary on the current state of the world and our pollutants – beneath the garbage there are still remnants of life. A house here, a fox den there, and even a few humans trying to exist in the trash-filled barricades. And luckily, you have the tools to help you.

Nothing better than being at home

(Image credit: Realms Distribution)

Ellen is armed with what is essentially a backpack containing a vacuum cleaner, a garden hose, and a drill. While only video game logic will explain how it all fits into a package you can carry on your back, that’s all it needs to start cleaning up all that trash. I’m sure we can all agree that in real life taking out the trash is a job we all put off, but there’s such a satisfying loop in cleaning up debris in No Place Like Home that I’m looking forward to it. . Each new area you discover is full of things, mountains of mud that will need to be dug into its parts and then vacuumed up with your vacuum cleaner. It’s exactly the sort of thing that anyone who loves House Flipper will enjoy, as it’s beautifully mundane and meditative work, backed by a soothing soundtrack. And you have to get every bit, otherwise you will only make the animals sad.

Here little pig

Nothing better than being at home

(Image credit: Realms Distribution)

Because it’s not just trash. Beneath (literally) the trash lies a world waiting to be revitalized. Among the dirt, you will find seeds and animals desperately looking for a palace to settle in. So, using the things and creatures you find, you’ll start turning the land around your grandfather’s house into your own farm, with just crops at first, but then chickens, pigs, and even chickens. cute little robots and mechanical llamas that will bring you building materials and other useful items. There are also some nice little touches for your home base, like the ability to give your critters names and tiny little hats, which range from bunny ears and sombreros to propeller caps and flower crowns.

The more you explore, the more fellow humans you’ll encounter – residents who decided to stay put when the rest of the world was evacuated to Mars. It’s pretty hilarious when you’re sucking up trash only to suddenly come across an architect trapped by a tree surrounded by piles of trash. He also never acknowledges his predicament, which makes it even weirder. These NPCs will give you other missions to undertake alongside your quest to find your grandfather and build your farming idyll. They can range from clearing an area of ​​toxic waste and building bizarre creations, to rescuing foxes, or making friends with ducks.

Nothing better than being at home

(Image credit: Realms Distribution)

There are also fights. Evil robots looking to poison you or kick your legs are also lurking in trash cans. There’s not a whole lot of nuance to this, beyond a few swipes of your drill and a bit of dodging and dodging, but there’s something quite endearing about always feeling in control. A kind of skill tree allows you to become more powerful and also supports some progress in the world, and as you unlock new areas the enemies get – slightly – tougher.

It’s also a huge place to explore, with an incredible variety of biomes. I’m about 20 hours in and I feel like I’ve only scratched the surface of what else is between the piles of trash. There’s so much to see and do, and it’s all geared towards that “oh just one more day” or “another mystery mushroom” mentality that makes games like this and Stardew Valley so much more.

I admit that this is not the most successful game. There are spelling mistakes in the text, awkward camera angles, and a few smudges of garbage that just won’t go away. It’s also often difficult to explain how to make money or do some of the most basic things in the game. Yet anyone looking to scratch a very specific gaming itch will somehow see that their sessions gameplay will go from minutes to hours. I blame the trash.

No Place Like Home is now available on PC.


More information about Have You Tried… making friends with pigs in a post-apocalyptic wasteland in No Place Like Home?

My god, there’s so much garbage. Towering monoliths of dirt, plastic bottles, rubber ducks, carrier bags, and other disposables are almost the sole visual language of the Earth you land on in No Place Like Home. You play as Ellen, a young woman who’s returned to Earth from her spaceship home to try and find her grandfather. But, what she returns to is a ramshackle farmhouse that’s been basically flattened by a trash storm that’s left nothing but rubbish in its wake. 
While that might sound like a nightmare – and a less than subtle commentary on the current state of the world and our pollutants – underneath the trash there are still some remnants of life. A house here, a fox den there, and even a few humans attempting to exist within the waste-filled barricades. And thankfully, you’ve got the tools to help. 

(Image credit: Realms Distribution)
Ellen is armed with what’s essentially a backpack containing a vacuum cleaner, a water hose, and a drill. While only video game logic will explain how that all fits together into a package that you can carry on your back, it’s everything she needs to start clearing all that detritus. I’m sure we can all agree that in real life, taking out the trash is a job we all put off, but there’s such a satisfying loop in clearing the debris in No Place Like Home that I actively look forward to it. Each new area you discover is chock full of the stuff, mountains of muck that’ll need to be drilled down into its parts, and then sucked up with your hoover. It’s exactly the sort of thing that anyone who likes House Flipper will enjoy, because it’s beautifully banal, meditative work, backed by a soothing soundtrack. And you’ve got to get every bit, otherwise, you’ll just make the animals sad.
Here little piggy

(Image credit: Realms Distribution)
Because it’s not all about trash. Underneath (quite literally) the garbage is a world that’s waiting for revitalization. Among the dirt, you’ll find seeds and animals desperate for a palace to call home. So using the things and critters you find, you’ll start to turn the land around your grandfather’s house into your own farm, with just crops at first, but then chickens, pigs, and even cute little robots and mechanical llamas that’ll bring you building materials and other useful items. There are lovely little touches for your home base too, like the option to give your critters names and tiny little hats, which range from bunny ears and sombreros to propeller caps and flower crowns. 
The further afield you explore, you’ll also meet up with other humans – residents who decided to stay behind when the rest of the world evacuated to Mars. It’s pretty hilarious when you’re sucking up trash to suddenly come across an architect trapped by a tree surrounded by trash mounds. He never acknowledges his predicament either, which somehow just makes it even more bizarre. These NPCs will give you other missions to take on alongside your quest to find your grandfather and build your farming idyll. They can range from ridding an area of toxic waste and building bizarre creations, to saving some foxes or making friends with ducks. 

(Image credit: Realms Distribution)
There’s combat too. Evil robots looking to poison you or ram your legs also lurk in the garbage. There’s not much nuance to it, beyond a few swipes of your drill and a little ducking and dodging, but there’s something pretty endearing about always feeling in control. A skill tree of sorts does let you get more powerful and underpins certain progress through the world too, and as you unlock new areas, the enemies get – slightly – tougher. 
It’s a huge locale to explore too, with an incredible variety in its biomes. I’m some 20 hours in and feel like I’ve only scratched the surface of what else there is between the trash piles.. There’s so much to see and do, and all geared towards that mentality of “oh just one more day” or “one more mysterious mushroom” that makes games like this and Stardew Valley so moreish. 
I’ll admit, it’s not the most polished game. There are spelling mistakes in the text, awkward camera angles, and some patches of trash that just won’t disappear. It’s also often terrible at explaining how to make money or do some of the more basic things in-game. Still, anyone looking to scratch a very specific gaming itch will somehow find their play sessions turn from minutes to hours. I blame the trash. 
No Place Like Home is out now on PC.

#making #friends #pigs #postapocalyptic #wasteland #Place #Home


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