White Hot: The Rise & Fall Of Abercrombie & Fitch: 8 Things The Doc Leaves Out

According to The New York Times, the company filed for bankruptcy in 1976 and was acquired. While White hot addresses the challenges they faced as a company before infamous CEO Mike Jeffries came on the scene, that information was left out.

The inclusion of this information can be important to the integrity of the story when discussing the brand story. The Abercrombie brand has gone from a popular outerwear manufacturer to a $1 million deficit in less than 10 years. But that was just the beginning of Abercrombie’s struggles.

Abercrombie marketed thong underwear for pre-teen girls

According to The Los Angeles Times, Abercrombie has sparked outrage for marketing thong underwear to pre-teen girls. In 2002, it was reported that the store received 120,000 emails from outraged individuals who were unhappy that the store was selling this item to a young audience. The store quickly pulled these items from the shelves after receiving this backlash.

The documentary leaves this controversy aside and focuses primarily on Abercrombie’s role of exclusion and racism among its employees. Diving into the issues the company has created due to its mature marketing to younger audiences might have pushed away the other everyday people stories covered in the documentary.

The way they mark their clothes abroad

Abercrombie has marked up its clothes 65% overseas. While the doc explains how their graphic t-shirts could be marked up by 85%, it doesn’t include the story of the company trying to break into the overseas market. According to Business Intern, when Abercrombie stores in the United States fell on hard times financially, the organization turned to its overseas marketing to fill a cost gap. They did this by marking up similar American products by 65%.

Although this revelation is not quite on the level of rogue tinderincluding the company’s interactions with their overseas stores would further shed light on their controversial history.

Abercrombie’s Environmental Impact

The documentary explains how Abercrombie & Fitch storefronts pumped their stores with cologne, but they didn’t mention how it was done hourly and the impact it had on a group of environmentalists . According to The cup, the organization, called “Teens Turning Green”, staged a protest at the brand’s flagship store on 57th Avenue in 2010.

The brand has faced numerous accusations claiming that the store was intentionally injecting harmful chemicals into its store. This issue was partially resolved when the store agreed to spray its cologne less often, but this controversy further alienated customers from supporting the brand.

Their “shattering” marketing

Around the same time as its infamous lawsuit in 2003/2004, family groups were boycotting Abercrombie & Fitch over its sexualized marketing. The doc discusses their photography and how the unique style has shaped the brand. He does not, however, go into detail about the backlash of his more sexualized marketing.

Business Intern explains how family groups claimed the marketing was “soft porn” and that they would no longer support the store. Including this controversy would have added an interesting layer to the documentary and how they have evolved in the age of social media and beyond.

Children’s swimwear

Another clash between Abercrombie’s short-lived children’s clothing brand was their swimwear line. According to Business Insider, Abercrombie marketed string bikinis for children. This upset consumers, again for the brand trying to ‘sexualise’ young girls.

Along with the thong controversy, it was an interesting choice to leave that scandal out of the documentary. The implications of marketing items like these swimsuits to a young audience only add fuel to the fire for the brand’s pattern of discrimination and sexualization in the early 2000s and early 2000s. 2010s. Now that Abercrombie is led by a female CEO, it would be interesting to see Netflix follow up on how the brand has changed under a strong, empowered woman.

Upset the Swifties

According to Billboard, in the early 2010s, Abercrombie & Fitch received the wrath of Taylor Swift fans for a t-shirt they were selling. This shirt carried the slogan “#more boyfriends than ts” Fans of arguably the most talked about artist of the past two decades weren’t happy with the teasing of their beloved Taylor Swift.

Abercrombie quickly pulled the t-shirt from shelves and made it unavailable to customers. This action is just one of many where the company has caused outrage and then quietly “solved” the issue without any form of apology to its customers.

Other discriminatory practices

From the documentary, viewers know that Abercrombie had a shocking “hot or not” employee handbook. According to ABC NewsRiam Dean also claimed to be an employee who was abused because of her prosthetic arm which she had had since she was three months old.

This lawsuit has reinforced Abercrombie & Fitch’s reputation for discrimination and has brought to light and further expose the organization’s “appearance” policy and controversial business practices.


More information about White Hot: The Rise & Fall Of Abercrombie & Fitch: 8 Things The Doc Leaves Out

According to The New York Times, the company filed for bankruptcy in 1976 and was acquired. While White Hot addresses the struggles they faced as a company before the infamous CEO Mike Jeffries joined the scene, this information was left out.
Including this information could be important to the integrity of the story when discussing the brand’s history. The Abercrombie brand went from being a popular outerwear clothier to hitting a $1 million dollar deficit in less than 10 years’ time. But this was only the beginning of Abercrombie’s struggles.
Abercrombie Marketed Thong Underwear To Pre-Teen Girls

According to The Los Angeles Times, Abercrombie sparked outrage for marketing thong underwear to pre-teen girls. In 2002, it was reported that the store received 120,000 emails from outraged individuals who were upset that the store would sell this item to a young audience. The store quickly pulled these items from the shelves after receiving this backlash.
The documentary leaves out this controversy and focuses mostly on Abercrombie’s role of exclusion and racism among its employees. Diving into the problems that the company created due to its mature marketing to a younger audience could’ve taken away from the other stories of regular people that the documentary covers.
The Way They Mark Up Their Clothing Overseas

Abercrombie marked up its clothing 65 percent overseas. While the doc touches on how their graphic t-shirts could be marked up 85 percent, it did not include the story of the company trying to break into the market overseas. According to Business Insider, when the Abercrombie stores in the United States hit a rough patch financially, the organization turned to its marketing overseas in order to make up a cost deficit. They did so by marking up similar U.S. products by 65 percent.
While this revelation is not quite to the level of the Tinder Swindler, including the company’s interactions with their stores overseas would further shed a light on their history of controversy.
Abercrombie’s Environmental Impact

The documentary does discuss how the Abercrombie & Fitch storefronts pumped their stores with cologne but they did not mention how this was done every single hour and the impact it had on a group of environmentalists. According to The Cut, the organization, called “Teens Turning Green,” held a protest at the brand’s flagship store on 57th avenue back in 2010.
The Brand experienced a lot of accusations claiming that the store was willingly pumping harmful chemicals into their store. This issue partially resolved itself when the store agreed to spray their cologne less often, but this controversy further distanced more customers from supporting the brand.
Their “Upsetting” Marketing

Around the same time as its infamous lawsuit in 2003/2004, family groups were boycotting Abercrombie & Fitch for its sexualized marketing. The doc discusses their photography and how the unique style shaped the brand. It however does not go into detail about the backlash of its more sexualized marketing.
Business Insider discusses how family groups claimed the marketing was “soft porn” and they would no longer be supporting the store. Including this controversy would’ve added an interesting layer to the documentary and how they have evolved in the age of social media and beyond.
The Kids’ Bathing Suits

Another conflict among Abercrombie’s short-lived child’s clothing brand was their line of swimsuits. According to Business Insider, Abercrombie marketed string bikinis to children. This left consumers upset, yet again for the brand trying to “sexualize” young girls.
Along with the thong underwear controversy, it was an interesting choice to leave out this scandal in the documentary. The implications of marketing items like these bathing suits to a young audience only add fuel to the fire for the brand’s pattern of discrimination and sexualization in the early 2000s and early 2010s. Now that Abercrombie is run by a female CEO, it would be interesting to see Netflix do a follow-up on how the brand has changed under a strong and empowered woman.
Upsetting Swifties

According to Billboard, in the early 2010s, Abercrombie & Fitch received anger from Taylor Swift fans for a t-shirt they were selling. This shirt held the slogan “#more boyfriends than t.s.” Fans of the arguably most talked about artist of the past two decades were not happy with the mockery of their beloved Taylor Swift.
Abercrombie quickly pulled the t-shirt from the shelves and made it no longer available to customers. This action is just one of many where the company caused outrage and then quietly “fixed” the issue without any form of apology to their customers.
Other Discriminatory Practices

From the documentary, viewers know that Abercrombie had a shocking “hot or not” employee handbook. According to ABC News, Riam Dean also claimed to be a mistreated employee due to her prosthetic arm that she had since she was three months old.
This lawsuit further cemented Abercrombie & Fitch’s reputation for discrimination and shed more light and exposure on the organization’s “looks” policy and its controversial business practices.

#White #Hot #Rise #Fall #Abercrombie #Fitch #Doc #Leaves


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